articles for photographers

Which portrait lens should I use for landscapes?

The title of this article deliberately includes oxymoron... After all, it would seem that a portrait lens is needed for portraits, and a landscape lens for landscapes. Yes and no. By the way, this was separately written about here:

Typically ultra-wide angles are used for landscape photography. But this rule doesn't always work.

What is the difference between the transmission of perspective at short and long focal lengths?

Wide angle lens unfolds the perspective: objects in the center of the frame visually become farther from the viewer, while everything that is located in the corners becomes closer. Shooting a landscape at a wide angle (especially an ultra-wide one like 14mm), you should always think about separating the foreground and background. the difference between them is enormous due to the specific rendering of perspective at this focal length.

landscape photo at 14mm 14mm landscape photo [/ caption "thumb_margin_left =" 2 ″ thumb_margin_bottom = "2 ″ thumb_border_radius =" 2 ″ thumb_shadow = "0 1px 4px rgba (0, 0, 0, 0.2)" js_play_delay = "3000 ″ id =" "random = "0 ″ group =" 0 ″ border = "" type = "yoxview" show_in_popup = "0 ″ album_cover =" "album_cover_width =" 200 ″ album_cover_height = "200 ″ popup_width =" 800 ″ popup_max_height = "600 ″ popup_title =" Gallery "sc_id =" sc1494140251333 ″]Telephoto lens on the contrary, it compresses the perspective. The longer the focal length, the less the viewer can see the difference between near and far objects (compression effect). This isn't bad for landscape photography. It simply requires a change in the standard perception of landscape photography (landscape is when everything that the eye sees fits into the frame). By shooting with a telephoto lens, you will only capture a fraction of what is visible with the normal eye. These photos are even more interesting because of the non-standard perspective that creates the effect of layering the landscape.

landscape photo with 70-200mm lens landscape photo with Canon 70-200mm lens [/ caption "thumb_margin_left =" 2 ″ thumb_margin_bottom = "2 ″ thumb_border_radius =" 2 ″ thumb_shadow = "0 1px 4px rgba (0, 0, 0, 0.2)" js_play_delay = "3000 ″ id = "" Random = "0 ″ group =" 0 ″ border = "" type = "yoxview" show_in_popup = "0 ″ album_cover =" "album_cover_width =" 200 ″ album_cover_height = "200 ″ popup_width =" 800 ″ popup_max_height = "600 ″ Popup_title = "Gallery" sc_id = "sc1494140251333 ″]landscape photo at 85mm 85mm landscape photo [/ caption "thumb_margin_left =" 2 ″ thumb_margin_bottom = "2 ″ thumb_border_radius =" 2 ″ thumb_shadow = "0 1px 4px rgba (0, 0, 0, 0.2)" js_play_delay = "3000 ″ id =" "random = "0 ″ group =" 0 ″ border = "" type = "yoxview" show_in_popup = "0 ″ album_cover =" "album_cover_width =" 200 ″ album_cover_height = "200 ″ popup_width =" 800 ″ popup_max_height = "600 ″ popup_title =" Gallery "sc_id =" sc1494140251333 ″]So, let's move on to the main thing. What lens should you choose?

In this article, we are talking about a lens suitable for both portrait and landscape photography. Therefore, it should be borne in mind that not every telephoto lens is a portrait lens. From 200mm shoot portraits will be very problematic. Although for landscape photography extreme focal lengths like 300mm or 400mm can be very interesting.

Lenses that are suitable for both landscapes and portraits:

Why these focal lengths?

I deliberately left out my favorite portrait painter here. Canon EF 85mm f1.8 USMsince 85mm gives a slight compression of the space, which is not enough for the landscape to begin to delaminate beautifully. The 135mm fix is ​​certainly good, in particular because of the incredible sharpness, which is important for landscape photography, and it is also half the size and lighter than the 70-200 zoom. But for landscape photography, the 70-200 will still be more interesting, because you can control the perspective and crop interesting parts of the landscape. And in order for the 70-200 to cope better with portraits, of course, you need to take the faster version with f2.8. Although, if your focus is more on landscape photography, then an inexpensive, lighter and more compact f4 will do just as well.

By the way, for a sample, you can do with a manual lens. For example:

This 135mm lens is remarkably sharp from an open aperture of f3.5 and is very compact for travel. In portraits, it will be harder. Manual focus will make itself felt - you will see it on a bored model while you focus :)

When shooting landscapes on telephoto, you need to understand that the scope for activity is, of course, more limited than with shirikas. Please note that to shoot a landscape on a telephoto camera, there must be an open area in front of you, viewed for kilometers into the distance.